Victory Gardens in the 1940’s and Canning, Storing, and Preserving Fruits and Vegetables

Lot of 2 Victory Garden Canning     Purchase these Collectible Canning Booklets

Our history is fascinating! As World War II pressed down on the world, our government began to heavily promote the advantages of citizens planting a “Victory Garden”. The two booklets above were results of this push for the population to grow, harvest, can, and store their crops.

Several different methods of preserving fruits and vegetables can be followed in these Booklets.

“How to Can Finer Fruits and save Sugar”

Kero Syrup's promotional booklet for canning and saving sugar.

Kero Syrup’s promotional booklet for canning and saving sugar.

Lot of 2 Victory Garden Canning (5)

Booklet of information from The National Victory Garden , Inc.  Includes instruction on Canning, Freezing, Dehydrating, Salting, and storage for Victory Garden's harvests.

Booklet of information from The National Victory Garden , Inc.
Includes instruction on Canning, Freezing, Dehydrating, Salting, and storage for Victory Garden’s harvests.

Victory Gardens

Buying Victory Garden seeds

“As part of the war effort, the government rationed foods like sugar, butter, milk, cheese, eggs, coffee, meat and canned goods. Labor and transportation shortages made it hard to harvest and move fruits and vegetables to market. So, the government turned to its citizens and encouraged them to plant “Victory Gardens.” They wanted individuals to provide their own fruits and vegetables.

Nearly 20 million Americans answered the call. They planted gardens in backyards, empty lots and even city rooftops. Neighbors pooled their resources, planted different kinds of foods and formed cooperatives, all in the name of patriotism.

Farm families, of course, had been planting gardens and preserving produce for generations. Now, their urban cousins got into the act. All in the name of patriotism. ” from: http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org

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